Elizabeth Zimmermann Yoke Cheat Sheet

http://www.ravelry.com/discuss/zimmermaniacs/3181945/1-25

Excellent summation by skeincharmer on ravelry.

Full post follows:

Greetings!
xraymd found my blog posts about EZ yokes comparison in Russian (1, 2), and asked for details, so I decided to put sort of translation here as this place seems the most appropriate.
I am a bit lazy to redraw my atrocious ‘schematics’ from the first post (because they are innacurate a bit), so here is the text version.

As we know, Elizabeth Zimmermann wasn’t very concerned about row gauge, but we can assume quite reliably that her favourite 5spi could be accompanied with either 7.5rpi (2:3 stitch to row ratio), 6.6rpi (3:4 stitch to row ratio), or 7rpi (5:7 stitch to row ratio). This brings us the following numbers:

Circular yoke (from Knitting Without Tears)
Body circumference (40”): 200 sts (K).
Upper sleeve: 33% K = 66 sts.
Underarm: 8% K = 16 sts.
Yoke circumference: 268 sts.
Neck opening: 40% K = 80 sts, 16”.
Yoke height: 25% K in inches = 10” = 66-75 rounds depending on rpi.
Yoke circumference after first series of decreases: 268/3×2 = 179 sts (at 33-35-38 round).
Yoke circumference after second series of decreases: 179/3×2 = 120 sts (at 50-53-56 round).
Yoke circumference after third series of decreases: 120/3×2 = 80 sts.
Back of neck shaping: 6 rows.

Circular yoke (from Knitting Around)
The only difference from the previous version is yoke decreases:
Yoke circumference after first series of decreases: 268/4×3 = 201 sts (at 33-35-38 round).
Yoke circumference after second series of decreases: 201/3×2 = 134 sts (at 50-53-56 round).
Yoke circumference after third series of decreases: 134/5×3 = 80 sts.
This yoke is wider from neck to shoulders, hence more anatomical.

Raglan
Body circumference (40”): 200 sts (K).
Upper sleeve: 33% K = 66 sts.
Underarm: 8% K = 16 sts.
Yoke circumference: 268 sts, of which
Yoke for sleeve: 50 sts,
Yoke for front/back: 84 sts.
Yoke height: 50 rounds (because we decrease sleeve stitches altogether).
Yoke height in inches: from 7.5” at 6.6rpi to 6.6” at 7.5rpi. I.e. 2.5”-3.5” shorter than circular yoke! That’s why we’re directed to knit “couple of inches” on all yoke stitches before starting raglan decreases.
Back neck width: 84-50 = 34 sts, 6.8”.
Front neck width: 34 sts.
Front neck depth: 10 rows, 1.3”-1.5” depending on rpi.
Neck opening (averaged): 2×6.8+2×1.4 = 16.4”.

Saddle-shoulder
Body circumference (40”): 200 sts (K).
Upper sleeve: 33% K = 66 sts.
Underarm: 8% K = 16 sts.
Yoke circumference: 268 sts, of which
Yoke for sleeve: 50 sts,
Yoke for front/back: 84 sts.
Cross-shoulder: 35% K = 70 sts.
Saddle: 8% K = 16 sts, 3.2”.
Underarm decreases: (84-70)/2 = 7 rounds,
Sleeve cap decreases: (50-16)/2 = 17 rounds,
Rounding up for saddle: 10 rounds,
Total yoke height without saddle: 7+17+10 = 32 rounds, 4.3”-4.8” depending on rpi.
Total yoke height including half of saddle (averaged): 3.2/2+4.5 = 6.1”. I.e. even shorter than raglan.
Front/back neck width: 34 sts, 6.8”.
Front neck depth: 8 sts, 1.6”.
Neck opening: 2×6.8+2×1.6 = 16.8”.

Hybrid
Body circumference (40”): 200 sts (K).
Upper sleeve: 33% K = 66 sts.
Underarm: 5% K = 10 sts.
Yoke circumference: 292 sts, of which
Yoke for sleeve: 56 sts,
Yoke for front/back: 90 sts.
Saddle: 16% K = 32 sts, 6.4”.
“Raglan” yoke: (56-32)/2×3 = 36 rounds, 4.8”-5.45” depending on rpi.
Total yoke height including half of saddle (averaged): 6.4/2+5.125 = 8.325”. Still shorter than circular yoke.
Saddle length: 44 rows.
Saddle length for body: 22 sts.
Front/back neck width: 90-2×12-2×22 = 22 sts, 4.4”.
Front neck depth: 16 sts, 3.2”.
Neck opening: 2×4.4+2×3.2 = 15.2”.

Shirt yoke
The only difference from Hybrid is that Shirt yoke back of neck is formed by a saddle
Back neck width: 44 rows, 5.86”-6.6” depending on rpi.
Neck opening (averaged): 4.4”+6.3”+2×3.2”=17”.

Seamless set-in sleeve
Body circumference (40”): 200 sts (K).
Upper sleeve: 33% K = 66 sts.
Underarm: 8% K = 16 sts.
Yoke circumference: 268 sts, of which
Yoke for sleeve: 50 sts,
Yoke for front/back: 84 sts.
Cross-shoulder: 35% K = 70 sts.
Top of sleeve cap: 10 sts.
Underarm decreases: (84-70)/2 = 7 rounds,
Sleeve cap decreases every other round (till 16% K = 32 sts): (50-32)/2×2 = 18 rounds,
Sleeve cap decreases every round (till 10 sts): (32-10)/2 = 11 rounds,
Top of armhole: 10 rows.
Sleeve cap total height: 7+18+11 = 36 rounds, 4.8”-5.45” depending on rpi.
Yoke total height: 7+18+11+10 = 46 rounds, 6.13”-6.96” depending on rpi, 6.55” at average.
Back neck width: 70/3 = 22 sts.
Back of neck shaping: (70-22)/2/3 = 8 rows.
(And I don’t remember about front of neck, sorry.)

As another point of reference, Priscilla Gibson-Roberts feature 20% K height for set-in sleeve yoke, i.e. 8”, in her Knitting in the Old Way: Designs & Techniques from Ethnic Sweaters (Nomad Press 2003). From this perspective, Hybrid and Shirt Yoke of EZ should be quite close to set-in sleeve of PGR.

Hope you like numbers as much as I do! :)

Final T-Topper Swatch Pattern

FINISHED SWATCH:

Swatch Swatch (folded)

Work Flow Chart:

TTopper1

CO 10 st on size 2 needles.

K 2 ridges (4 rows).

CO 10 st with knit on method.

turn and k to end of row.

CO 10 st with knit on method.

k 3 rows (shoulder)

k 15 st, place remaining 15 st on st holder (this is the neckline).

k 6 rows (neckline).

WITH SECOND BALL OF YARN:

pu the 15 st on the holder and k 6 rows.

Join with the other live st from the neckline.

This is the end of the neckline bifurcation.

k 3 rows (shoulder)

BO 10 st at each end.

k 2 ridges.

BO all st.

Seaming:

knit underarms to hem on left side, knit underarms to hem on right side.

Done and done.

Easy peasy top done.

Alternative T Topper Swatch

I could just swatch it side to size. That would prevent vertical growing.

TTopper1

All growing would be horizontal, and I’m getting pretty fat, so this may work.

If it gets baggy like that, can we just call it fashion?

Swatch: Doll clothes.

CO 1 in worth of stitches. Knit for a half inch or quarter inch, whatever looks right.

CO 2 in worth of stitches on right end with knitted cast on.

Go back and at other end, CO another 2 in worth of st with knitted cast on.

One side is the front, the other the back.

Keep going for like half an inch? Whatever looks right for the right shoulder width.

Put st on holder for back (or front, whatever).

Knit whatever looks right for the neck (half an inch again?)

With another skein of yarn, do the neck st for the st on the holder.

Knit back, join up the two sides again.

Knit – was it a half inch? – for the left shoulder width.

CO the 2 in of st on either side, k 1 in for the left shoulder. BO.

Measure, wash, block, measure.

Decide where to go once this is done.

I’ll do all this in garter, so the fabric is thicker and not see through, hopefully will stretch less, and make a nice summer tee.

Easy peasy in theory. Updates as theory becomes practice.

Rayon Yarn

Rayon is a plant made yarn. It’s made of cellulose.

It is not resilient. The yarn has no memory, and does not stretch and snap back like wool.

It grows and grows. It sucks to work with for anything that needs to be sized. So why am I determined to make a top out of it instead of a scarf or shawl?

I’ll make a doll sized T-topper and go from there.

TTopper2

This picture is for knitting bottom up with flat knitting (not circular).

To convert picture to circular, just ignore the top box.

Sorry, it’s late, and I feel lazy.

I should probably do another post about this third way to swatch the t-topper.

Whatever.

Planning:

CO in the round. I don’t have an actual doll, so it doesn’t really matter how I size it, just that I measure it before and after. MUST block to know how sweater will stand up to washing.

SO, let’s use small size 4 bamboo needles.

CO enough stitches for 2 inches body.

Knit to underarms, another 2 inches.

Separate front and back (put front st on stitch holder, and knit back st only).

CO 0.5 in st on either side with knit cast on method. Knit for another half inch. CO.

Do same for front side.

Graft shoulders together.

Neck size is same as between bra straps.

Measure. Wash. Measure again.

Will update as I finish the above.

Summer Viscose Top for ME

Yarn: Adrienne Vittadini Luisa
Color: Turquoise

Need to carefully plan this out, since I’ve never knit with viscose/rayon and nylon yarn before.

The yarn would make a superb summer top, though, if planned out and executed correctly.

I suspect it will grow. Swatch? Yes, definitely.

A sleeveless top would be great, but if those stretch, it hangs indecently low at the underarms. Then, it’s a waste of effort and of yarn.

Seamless seems to not have the necessary structure.

Idea: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/hotness-top

Raglan cap sleeve top.

Pattern is free and available here: http://www.redheart.com/files/patterns/pdf/SN0141.pdf

Concern: no one has knit this in rayon before. Most people do it in wool or worst case cotton. One in bamboo. IDK..

Size small is 36 in bust. IDK..

What about a T-topper tee? Knit from side to side? That way, if it stretches, it will stretch horizontally, instead of vertically?

Sweater for ME

Yarn: Adrienne Vittadini Luisa
Color: Turquoise
Clothing: Set in sleeve tee for the summer
Yarn makeup: Viscose (85%) and nylon (15%)
Size: Large :(

Pattern Inspiration: The Late Great Elizabeth Zimmermann

Needle size: 7 (29″ circulars)

I want a tee that is not too short, but not tunic length. I don’t like sleeveless tops or low necks. I like raglans and circular yokes, but have gotten bored of making them. I now want to knit a proper set in sleeve tee. Something with no ease or a bit of positive ease that can be worn all the time. Not lacy, since I do not want to have to wear a tank top underneath it to avoid flashing people.

Yarn label gauge: 4.5 st to 1 in on size 7 needles

Never mind Ms. Zimmermann.

Inspiration: Barbara Walker, Knitting from the Top, p. 81. Top down seamless set in sleeve sweater

I can’t do it. I’m tired of math. Sometimes you just want to be told what to do so you can start knitting. The planning that EZ and BW do take DAYS and MATH and MEASUREMENT. Right now UGH to that.

Inspiration: Ann Budd, Top Down Sweaters, p.130

Size: 38

My gauge on size 7 needles: 4 st to 1 in. It’s still see through.

Back to the drawing board.

Knitting for the Ungrateful

As a knitter, you want to knit for the special people in your life.

Most people pretend to like it, thank you for your hard work, send you a picture of them wearing it, and then move on with their life.

Some people, though, just suck.

Those people tell you what you did wrong with your knit gift, and hand it back to you because you need to correct the mistakes and learn how to knit like the “experts” that they grew up with before they will even consider wearing something you made.

These are the people that SUCK.

It sucks more when you are close to them and see them all the time. These are the people that comment on and critique your knitting, complaining it’s not as nice as the stuff they sell in the stores. These are the people who look put off when you suggest making things for them. These are the people that tell you that your stitches are not even, your gauge is off, your yarn could be better, your blocking needs work.

THESE PEOPLE SUCK.

One of these people has returned the knit hat I made her out of CASHMERE and MALABRIGO. Not a cheap yarn, not an easy pattern, not something that should be thrown back in your face. The hat was even monogrammed with their initial as a personalization.

THESE PEOPLE SUCK.

SO I made a resolution this day to NEVER NEVER NEVER knit something for this ungrateful, critical person again. NEVER NEVER NEVER.