Stormy Weather Hat

Stormy Weather Hat

Note: This pattern was inspired by the Ron and Hermione Hat on Ravelry. Frankly, I made so many changes to that hat that it became a totally different hat pattern. I thought I’d share this hat pattern for anyone else who may enjoy it. Please tell me how the pattern worked for you in the comments below.

Skills needed for this hat: cable knitting, long tail cast on, fair isle knitting, knit stitch, purl stitch, circular knitting, casting off

If you’ve never made a hat before, this should not be your first hat pattern. I’d recommend starting with Elizabeth Zimmermann’s Knitting Workshop hat pattern. If you can get the videos, they are SUPER helpful. THAT should be your first hat pattern (Learn circular knitting, long tail cast on, and fair isle!)

Size 6 16-inch circular needle, DPNs
Yarn: 2 skeins Malabrigo Silky Merino in Blue (DK weight) (using two strands held double) and 1 skein Debbie Bliss Baby Cashmerino in Black
Gauge: 6 st to 1 in over k1p1 ribbing
Gauge: 5 st to 1 in over stockinette

1. CO 100 st. Used long tail cast on with two color cast on (one strand [which is really two held together] blue, the other black). PM every 9 st.

2. k2 p2 for 2 inches in black yarn.

3. Increase to hat size: increase by 11 st to 110 st. Basically, every 9 st, increase one stitch. This row is done in all black yarn.

4. k6 in black yarn, p5 in blue yarn (repeat for 5 rows).

5. C3F [sl 3 st onto cable needle at front, k3, k3 from cable needle] in black yarn, p5 in blue yarn.

Repeat rows 4 and 5 six times. Then do row 4. End on row 4 to prep for decrease below.

Stormy Weather Hat - WIP

Stormy Weather Hat – WIP

DECREASE (keeping the blacks black and the blues blue):
RM = remove marker

6. [C3F (black), P5 (blue), RM, k1 (black), ssk (black), k2tog (black), k1 (black), p5 (blue), RM] x 4;; Note: keep the marker for the beginning of the round, for now. We will remove it later.

7. [k6 (black), p5 (blue), ssk (black), k2tog (black), p5 (blue)] x 5;; Note: I want you to look at your knitting and conceptually understand what you are doing – the first cable is being knit as usual, the purl stitches are being purled as usual, but that second cable, that is being decreased two stitches at a time per cable. At this point it should take a bit of effort on your circular needle. When the effort is too much, change over to DPNs. I make the changeover on the next row.

8. [k6 (black), p4 (blue), ssk (blue and black are being knit together with black thread), k2tog (black and blue are being knit together with black thread), p4 (blue)] x 5;; Note: I put each repeat on a different needle. That means I have 5 needs to hold the live stitches, and one working needle. I used my size 6 and 7 DPNs together. Don’t worry, it doesn’t mess up your work if you do that.

9. [k6 (black), p3 (blue), ssk (blue and black are being knit together with black thread), k2tog (black and blue are being knit together with black thread), p3 (blue)] x 5

10. [k6 (black), p2 (blue), ssk (blue and black are being knit together with black thread), k2tog (black and blue are being knit together with black thread), p2 (blue)] x 5

11. [k6 (black), p1 (blue), ssk (blue and black are being knit together with black thread), k2tog (black and blue are being knit together with black thread), p1 (blue)] x 5

12. [k6 (black), ssk (blue and black are being knit together with black thread), k2tog (black and blue are being knit together with black thread)] x 5;; Note: At the end of this row, only black stitches are left on the needle as live stitches.

13. There are now 8 stitches left on each needle. All are black. You can snip the blue yarn so it’s out of the way, leave a long enough tail to weave in securely (I suggest 6-8 inches).

14. [k2tog all around] x 20 (20 stitches left)

15. [k2tog all around] x 10 (10 stitches left)

16. Pull yarn through remaining loops, tug to tighten, knot and weave in ends.

Your hat is done! Enjoy!

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